Logo

2022 Creason Lecture - John Lansing - Speaker view
Lindsey Jones
01:02:37
To what extent to you think the profit motive is antithetical to journalistic integrity? And also, how are non-politically biase news sources supposed to adapt to the creation of a consumer base that actually wants politically slanted narrative?
Al Cross
01:04:54
John, a lot of conservatives would laugh at your assertion that NPR "may be the only news organization that is not politically motivated" that many in the audience will encounter in a given day. I have worked with NPR folks enough to testify that they have no political motive, or that they successfully suppress it. Why do you think many conservatives see NPR as liberal?
Jennifer Greer
01:04:56
Could you discuss how NPR journalists weigh "the truth" and "objectivity"? I hear often phrases like "President Trump claimed, with absolutely no evidence,...." These parenthetical phrases are relatively new in mainstream news outlets. At what point are they inserted? How much is too far? What discussions go on as to when to point out that these official statements aren't true?
Terry Keys
01:05:14
One of the things that strikes me about today’s media is that they use the terms — such as “fake news” — that were created by those who to steal the truth. Doesn’t repeating those terms that give credence to those who create those terms?
Kakie Urch
01:05:53
We are currently teaching podcasting to our advanced journalism students. Could you discuss some of the successes at NPR with podcasts -- even ones you thought wouldn't work?
Kakie Urch
01:08:36
Also: in terms of “money” — and the constant threat of governmental withdrawal of funds — has NPR and CPB considered doing “tax return designation” fundraising? I often give entire state tax return to state agencies. I would certainly give a good section of my fed return to you and Big Bird.
Kakie Urch
01:08:41
Cincinnati
Buck Ryan
01:11:55
Did you see the demise of CNN+ coming? Are there any lessons in the collapse for NPR?
Terry Keys
01:12:15
In follow up to the earlier questions, when will a lie be called a “lie” — rather than these wordy, parenthetical comments after the lie is printed/repeated?
Ryan Craig
01:13:37
Is the real problem today a lack of news literacy? What do you think should be done to help the average person understand how the news is collected and reported?
Tech Support (Chris)
01:13:52
BOO DUKE! lol
Tech Support (Chris)
01:13:58
(Kidding)
Jennifer Greer
01:14:30
Good question, Terry -- and to follow up to my question, what kinds of discussions go on about when to call it out and how explicitly to do so? What kind of discussions are newsrooms having about this?
Jen Smith
01:15:09
Would you encourage journalism students to get really good at story telling through one form of media or to branch out and dabble in several different ones? What do you want to see from young journalists?
Lindsay
01:15:55
You mentioned NPR and The New York Times are the two most trusted news outlets. The New York Times came under fire many years ago for its “collaboration” with WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange. Many were angry about its work with WikiLeaks. It sparked the discussion on where the line is between journalism and activism. Assange himself said he is more activist than journalist. How do you think journalist hold the line between journalism and activism? Or do you think it is even possible in the technology era to separate these two ideas?
Terry Keys
01:16:07
How is NPR using its experience to help other media outlets to move forward in this new media landscape— such as local news? Otherwise, it seems as if it’s more talking to an echo chamber. I really like Stephen Colbert, but if the “other side” doesn’t watch Stephen Colbert, he’s just entertainment for his fans and not relative to the political conversation.
Terry Keys
01:21:40
How is NPR preparing for the “deep fake
Terry Keys
01:21:53
“ Given that NPR is using more visuals?
Terry Keys
01:25:48
Not to be too picky, but I don’t recall hearing or reading a story from NPR that particularly noted that something was a “lie.”
Kakie Urch
01:25:52
Well that old hit “Richard Nixon lied." worked ok
Al Cross
01:29:13
To put a bow, hopefully, on the "lie" discussion: A lie is a falsehood told knowingly, so to call it a lie is to say that you know what the person knows. We can't read people's minds, but when we know that facts have been presented to them in ways that clearly establish the truth, and they make a statement to the contrary, it's a lie, and we can say so.
Jennifer Greer
01:29:55
This is what makes Al Cross so great. He uses words with precision.
Jen Smith
01:31:08
War coverage, political coverage, pandemic coverage. It’s all so much. What is NPR doing to help its journalists handle the stress of telling these kinds of stories?
Jennifer Greer
01:31:25
Great question, Jen!
Terry Keys
01:31:56
I’m in complete agreement with Al! Now, we need to print/say the word “lie” when it’s warranted!
Kakie Urch
01:32:56
Frank Langfitt for example
Jen Smith
01:34:26
Thank you so much!
Bryce Towle
01:34:35
Thank you so much
Scoobie Ryan
01:34:37
Thank you so much!!
Allyson DeVito
01:34:39
Thanks for a great lecture!
Terry Keys
01:34:47
Many, many thanks!